Teachers

If schools are interested in participating they MUST REGISTER THEIR SCHOOL –
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Teacher Training

Washington, DC

Training sessions provide teachers with a better understanding of the contest and the local watershed issues. The Program Coordinator is available for an in-person or group training. Call for a meeting today!

FREE – Classroom Presentations and Community Mentor 
Teachers may request a classroom presentation to introduce the topic of watersheds, discuss local environmental concerns and explain the contest. If a watershed ambassador is available, a 60 minute presentation will be provided plus mentorship throughout the contest. Free watershed resources are also available. Contact your local Program Coordinator.

Teacher Time Commitment

This contest can be an after school activity or in-class project. Student’s success directly relates to teachers assigning the contest and assisting students with their work. Giving students sufficient time to complete the contest assignment is more effective in producing quality projects.

  • Attend teacher training (optional)
  • Discuss and assign the contest 
    • 30 minutes
  • Assist students with ideas
    • time commitment will vary depending on level of interest of students and teacher
  • Remind students about contest entry deadline
    • initially every other week – 10 minutes times six weeks
    • every week one month prior to deadline – 10 minutes times four weeks
  • Students may want to give a classroom presentation (optional)
    • 5 minute time limit per presentation
  • If your student is selected as a finalist, help prepare them for their verbal presentation
    • up to 2 hours
  • If your student is selected as a finalist, attend verbal competition and awards presentation
    • 4 hours

Questions?

Call your local Program Coordinator today!

Curriculum Connections

DCPS Grade 6 Standards and Learning Activities – Click here

DCPS Grade 7 Standards and Learning Activities – Click here

GRADE 6

SCIENCE:

6.1. Scientific Thinking and Inquiry – Broad Concept: Scientific progress is made by asking relevant questions and conducting careful investigations. As a basis for understanding this concept, and to address the content in this grade, students should develop their own questions and perform investigations. All student points are relevant.

6.6. Resources – Broad Concept: Sources of materials differ in amounts, distribution, usefulness, and the time required for their formation. As a basis for understanding this concept, students should meet key points: (1) explain that fresh water is limited in supply and uneven in distribution, (2) recognize that fresh water is a resource that can be depleted or polluted, (7) describe that most rainwater that falls in Washington, DC, will eventually drain into the Chesapeake Bay, and (8) explain the important role of the water cycle within a watershed.

6.9. Earth and Life History – Broad Concept: Evidence from rocks allows us to understand the evolution of life on Earth. As the basis for understanding this concept, students should meet key point: (1) explain how the Earth’s surface is built up and broken down by natural processes, including deposition of sediments, rock formation, erosion, and weathering.

SOCIAL STUDIES:

6.1. The World in Spatial Terms – Broad Concept: Students use maps, globes, atlases, and other technologies to acquire and process information about people, places, and environments.
Key points: (8) ask geographic questions and obtain answers from a variety of sources, such as books, atlases, and other written materials; statistical source material; fieldwork and interviews; remote sensing; word processing; and GIS. Reach conclusions and give oral, written, graphic, and cartographic expression to conclusions; (9) give examples of how maps can be used to convey a point of view, so that critical analysis of map sources is essential; (10) explain that people develop their own mental maps or personal perceptions of places in the world, that their experiences and culture influence their perceptions, and that these perceptions tend to influence their decision-making.

6.5. Physical Systems – Broad Concept: Students acquire a framework for thinking about Earth’s physical systems: Earth-sun relationships, climate and related ecosystems, and landforms. Key Point (11): use a variety of means to research the sources of different types of pollution in the local community and design measures that can be taken to reduce each type of pollution.

6.6. Environment and Society – Broad Concept: Students analyze ways in which humans affect and are affected by their physical environment. Most student points are relevant.

MATH:

Strand: Geometry
Strand: Measurement
Strand: Data Analysis, Statistics, and Probability

LANGUAGE ARTS:

Strand: Language Development – 6.LD-O.6 Oral Presentation
Strand: Research – 6.R.1. Research; Apply steps for obtaining information from a variety of sources, organizing information, documenting sources, and presenting research in individual and group projects.
Strand: Writing – 6.W-E.3. Expository Writing; Write research reports

GRADE 7

SCIENCE:

7.1. Scientific Thinking and Inquiry – Broad Concept: Scientific progress is made by asking relevant questions and conducting careful investigations. As a basis for understanding this concept, and to address the content in this grade, students should develop their own questions and perform investigations. All student points are relevant.

7.3. Biological Classifications – Broad Concept: Similarities are used to classify organisms because they may be used to infer the degree of relatedness among organisms. As a basis for understanding this concept, students should meet key point: (2) recognize and describe that biological classifications are based on how organisms are related: organisms are classified into a hierarchy of groups and subgroups, with species as the most fundamental unit.

7.8. Ecology – Broad Concept: Organisms in ecosystems exchange energy and nutrients among themselves and with the physical environment. As a basis for understanding this concept, students should meet key points: most all points are relevant.

SOCIAL STUDIES:

World History and Geography: Ancient World – Early River Civilizations 1000 B.C.

MATH:

Strand: Geometry
Strand: Measurement
Strand: Data Analysis, Statistics, and Probability

LANGUAGE ARTS:

Strand: Language Development – 6.LD-O.6 Oral Presentation
Strand: Research – 7.R.1. Research; Apply steps for obtaining information from a variety of sources, organizing information, documenting sources, and presenting research in individual and group projects.
Strand: Writing – 7.W-E.3. Expository Writing; Write content-based research reports and 7.W-R.5. Revision; Revise writing